Home Study Certification Courses? Aura Wellness Center, etc


#21

That’s a good question, one that has been debated many times on this forum.

Why was so much importance put on lineage? Why did a yoga practitioner not become a teacher until their guru said they were a teacher? Were the masters of old worried about the erosion of the foundation of yoga? Did they forsee, “Yoga in a box” one day?

[QUOTE=Kushvinder;58736]My point is the combination of education and technology has changed most universities around the world[/QUOTE]
I don’t dispute that. But just because we CAN doesn’t mean we SHOULD. We must be discerning in our utilization of technology.


#22

Something just clicked for me. Online yoga certification programs may [B]be breaking the law[/B] in many states. I know of at least 14 states that regulate yoga schools. Many take their requirements from Yoga Alliance and some are even more stringent. Let’s look at Yoga Alliance’s 200 hour requirements: http://yogaalliance.org/content/200-hour-standards

180 of the 200 hours are required CONTACT hours. What do they define as a contact hour?

[B]Contact Hours A contact hour is a classroom hour in the physical presence of a faculty member.[/B] Contact hours in each category must be in a dedicated teacher training environment (into which others might occasionally be invited) rather than in classes intended for the general public. Of the required contact hours, a number are specified in the five educational categories. Remaining hours must be distributed among the five educational categories and can be taught by any faculty member.
If I’m correct and you live in one of those states and took an online yoga certification class, your certification may in fact not even be legally valid, much less ethically valid.

Hahahahahah. Oh boy, this could get interesting…


#23

Dear David,

There is something to this idea of shooting the horse and it is not Yogic. Do you have a YA card? The states do not want Yoga Alliance in the way. They want tax money. There seems to be a double standard here. The self-appointed online Yoga registry, which is not a government agency and is not recognized by any government anywhere has your complete approval.

This is the organization that created itself in 1999 and didn’t answer the phone because they thought the state of Virginia would call. They register people without seeing them teach a class. Please do diligent research before jumping to conclusions. Anyone can get a YA card without taking a test. Many of them are uncertified or their original diploma has expired. Think about it…

Hari Om


#24

Kushvinder,

Are you in any way affiliated with Aura Wellness?

As for Yoga Alliance, I don’t support them because [B]I feel their standards are far too lax.[/B]

But the fact is, many states base their laws upon Yoga Alliance standards. It doesn’t matter what we think of them if the law states we must adhere to their minimum standards.

[QUOTE=Kushvinder;58857]They register people without seeing them teach a class.[/QUOTE]
The horror. Just think if they certified people as yoga teachers without seeing them ever teach a class…


#25

Dear David,

No, I am impartial and not affiliated with the wellness center you discuss on this thread. I do know about YAs past inactions and finally acting in Texas. We can quote YA policy, but no government will let them have the driver’s seat. Since they trademark everything, they would want a cut of the state’s spoils. Online registering of Yoga teachers without taking an exam does not deserve a pass.

Hari Om


#26

I’m not quoting their policy to prove something good about YA so much as I’m stating that many states LAWFULLY REQUIRE that yoga teacher certification meet Yoga Alliance standards. If a school does not and certifies people in one of those states they are likely breaking the law and the student’s “certification” is probably not valid. I’m thinking of having my attorney look into this to find out for sure and then potentially take action based upon his findings.

[QUOTE=Kushvinder;58870]Online registering of Yoga teachers without taking an exam does not deserve a pass.[/QUOTE]
But online certification of yoga teachers without so much as ever meeting them in person, much less seeing them teach, does pass?


#27

Dear David,

I am on the fence here. When visiting their site, I noticed they require a practical exam video or in person testing. It seems interesting because I am not against learning anything online. I have taken college courses online in the past. That is why I also enjoy this online conversation. You are teaching me and I hope you might learn something from me as well.

Hari Om


#28

I’m with you, I think learning online is FANTASTIC. I wouldn’t be where I am today if it wasn’t for learning online. But there is a limit and some things require substantial in person interaction.

And yes, I have no doubt there is much I can learn from you. I hope you stick around and take part in other threads and share your knowledge and wisdom.


#29

Dear David,

You are very kind. Thank you for that. I will visit other threads. Personally, I think we could help this situation with suggestions to this center as to what would help improve these courses. It seems they are very concerned with safety. Even in India, traditional thinking has changed with online resources.

Hari Om - My Friend


#30

I am probably really late to this discussion, but I have questions of you all.

I have two beautiful young Daughters, My first, I had a difficult pregnancy and birth - absorbed by a stressful job and a sluggish lifestyle.

However for the pregnancy of my second daughter - my husband [who was studying while I was pregnant with our first] Had more time on his hands to help, I wasn’t working AND i religiously practiced Yoga.

My husband is a Chiropractor - so he regularly adjusts me, especially during my second pregnancy, which I believe had a huge impact, However there is no question in my mind that what made most of the difference was Yoga - including my labour time decreasing by 22 hours [YES FROM 27 Hours with our eldest - to 5 easy beautiful hours with our second].

The only way I practice/d Yoga however was through DVD, as this was all I could afford and all that was readily at my finger tips.

After reading comments, especially posted by ‘david’ - I am curious - because you so heavily question Yoga practice in any other form other than in one on one [person], I realize your talking about studying, but one of your points is that the students may not be taking correct forms and injure themselves… Isn’t that just as likely or even more likely if the student is practicing from a DVD?

On top of that - it is a dream of mine to be able to help woman, like myself have the confidence and the opportunity to have beautiful, natural births and the way I hope to do this is through Yoga. The only place that I can complete this is by distance learning - And the course I too am looking at is The Aura course. I am In NZ - so we have limited courses - especially since I am not based in any of the bigger cities.

I would really like your opinion on this - as you all seem so wise and opinionated, and I am a little bit lost as to how I can approach becoming a pre-natal yoga instructor.

The other thing I have found with The Aura place is that one of the level 1 programs you can study is Power Yoga, Which i really enjoy, but is also not available in NZ. [The Aura Pre/post natal course is a level 2 and is only available to students who have already completed level 1.] I look forward to your responses. Allie


#31

I have no problem with people getting a DVD and practicing at home. Yes, in person with a good teacher is much better, but a DVD can be a decent tool when a substitution is necessary.

But distance teacher training is nothing more than a scam in my opinion. Because you are NOT going to be a yoga teacher. You may call what you’re teaching yoga, but you will not be teaching yoga. Granted, the same scenario is likely from many of the in person “yoga” teacher trainings as they’re absolutely terrible, but the chance of you becoming a yoga teacher from distance learning is virtually nil.

Just as some company sending me a packet I learn and telling me I am a doctor once I finish it, the same is true of some company sending me a packet and some DVDs and telling me I am a yoga teacher after I am done with it. In my opinion, it’s all a scam. And if you can’t see that, then you don’t have the yoga experience necessary to even think about becoming a teacher. Just focus on your practice for now.


#32

I started this thread, and looked closely at online and mail order certifications…

In my opinion - if you feel their course is value for money, looks informative, and well structured;then consider it, especially if no Yoga teachers or schools near you.

But DO NOT do it thinking you will become a teacher after it or it is all you will need to become a teacher. The certficates certifying you as an Instructor or completing such a program are worthless; in fact in many places that look for e.g. Yoga Alliance 200hr certification as a minimum they won’t allow you to teach!

Regarding places like Aura Wellness Center (see link in first post on this thread), if you choose any of their packages - do the maths, go to Amazon, etc check out prices you can get most of those materials for and see if value for money or not.

When you look at testimonials on Aura Wellness Center (there are hundreds!) many people are very happy with the courses & many have gone on to become teachers - here is random example : -
http://www.kiranshashiyoga.co.uk/

[I]On Profile there (http://www.kiranshashiyoga.co.uk/profile) : Kiran is a certified yoga teacher, Reiki Master, Nutritionist and massage therapist, first learning the art in India with family and certifying with a Diploma at The State Council of Education Research & Training in Delhi. She has also the following qualifications:

? High Honours Yoga Teachers Diploma studying with the Aura Wellness Centre.

? The highest grade Diploma in Nutrition and Advanced Nutrition studying at the School of Natural Health Science

? Diploma in Holistic massage[/I]

The High Honours Teachers Diploma from Aura Wellness Center may have been in person, it does not specify. The Center does on site live training also at HQ in U.S. If not then it was through online/mail order certification. The School of Natural Health Science appears to be another mail order / online certification place (there may be others with same name that do live on site training). Diploma in India must have been live in person training, don’t know any more about it.

N.B. This may well be an excellent and knowledgable teacher (site shows several classes in different locations and photos with students) but the qualifications, I think some might wonder if they are as recognised as Yoga Alliance 200hr certification (doing live Teachers Training with teachers) etc.

Agree with what David says above, well almost - some offering these courses might be very sincere in trying to offer education programs in Yoga especially for those with no access to teachers in their locality or for another reason cannot attend classes, of course they are making money from it as any teacher is. Others are as David said out to make a fast buck from gullible people or people who want to become Yoga Instructors overnight. It would be better if they said or stated clearly on any certificates this is online/homestudy course and that the bearer should undertake live training also for minimum no. of hours.


#33

I have been a personal trainer for over 15 years. I am very familiar with proper body alignment, I have taught aerobics classes and worked with hundreds of students over the course of my career. I am very interested in furthering my education and I find myself being pulled towards Yoga. I have been researching a few schools in the area and they seem incredible over priced and I am concerned that their genuine intention is not so much to build great teachers but to just make money. My dream would be to eventually travel to India and learn the principles from where it began.
Now, I have three children at home, I am currently working towards my masters online and I found Aura to be a pretty in depth program. I checked the BBB and they have had no complaints with regards to their school or education. I am comparing them to what I have available here locally and from my research it seems that this is a better option. (even if it is online)
What say you to someone who has a strong understanding of proper body alignment, who has practiced yoga for a few years and still wants to train online? I believe it’s not so much where you get your education but what you take from it. It’s not enough for me to pay top dollar at a local institution, I need to feel that they are on a genuine path. Perhaps I have not found a good enough school? Maybe there is a place here in Miami that I have yet to discover?

Would be most appreciative of some direction with this matter.

Many Thanks.


#34

I have taken both online and traditional live training, and I’ve gotten a lot out of both. I think you need some hands-on training, but I also think home study and online training has a place. I took the online training from Paul and Marie Jerard and found it exceptional.


#35

[QUOTE=David;58704]

Would we certify a doctor online? Of course not. Would we certify a physical therapist online? Of course not. Would we certify a psychologist online? Of course not. All require human interaction. Yet a good yoga teacher plays each of roles in part, and more. And that’s not taking into account the importance of a master teacher evaluating the prospective student in person and countless other variables.

If you want to certify a history major online, I won’t say a word. If you want to certify a yoga teacher online, I’m going to call you out.

In my opinion, anyone certified by an online yoga certification program should be boycotted. Everyone should ask where their teachers are certified and if their only certification is online, they should find another teacher. That’s the best way to put these predatory yoga teacher training puppy mills out of business.[/QUOTE]

I’m getting an advanced Nursing Degree online. :confused:
Yes, I’m going to have to do some clinical work, but very limited number of hours.
I think reading this thread has answered some of my own questions.
Specifically, I do think that online at home study can be a great [U]base[/U] for yoga instruction and deepening of one’s own practice.
I also think that in order to be a ‘yoga teacher’, it is not necessary to teach a class of postures, but rather, one can teach yoga through everyday interactions with people and the Earth.


#36

[QUOTE=bunniemny;70030]Specifically, I do think that online at home study can be a great [U]base[/U] for yoga instruction and deepening of one’s own practice.[/QUOTE]
I don’t dispute that. You can learn the “base” of yoga related terminology and read some pertinent books via an online course. But then once you have that base, you need to pour the foundation, the walls, and build the roof. Then once you have that shell of your structure, you can work on the inside. Until you’ve built that complete structure, you are not a true teacher despite what a piece of paper and your ego tells you because you’re going to bring students into that incomplete structure and it’s going to come crashing down.

It’s time the yoga community update its building codes and tear down the dangerous structures.


#37

I agree with your basic theory David, and I do think that the online or at home study courses are perfect for people (such as me and the OP) to gain more insight into their own practice.
And that’s the thing, yoga is a practice, so yes, you do need personal experience with a trained instructor, I’m personally hoping to work that out SOMEHOW in the future, but it’s important to remember that every teacher, no matter how extensive their study and years of experience, is still in practice and still learning, as there really is no ‘end’ to the practice.


#38

[QUOTE=bunniemny;70034]I agree with your basic theory David, and I do think that the online or at home study courses are perfect for people (such as me and the OP) to gain more insight into their own practice.
And that’s the thing, yoga is a practice, so yes, you do need personal experience with a trained instructor, I’m personally hoping to work that out SOMEHOW in the future, but it’s important to remember that every teacher, no matter how extensive their study and years of experience, is still in practice and still learning, as there really is no ‘end’ to the practice.[/QUOTE]

Quite interesting. This is the way most politicians in India have been manipulating innocent and illiterate people for last 60 years. But nowadays some of them are getting it back in a not so pleasant way. Lets carry on with positive discussions on yoga.


#39

[QUOTE=ActiveLink;70058]Quite interesting. This is the way most politicians in India have been manipulating innocent and illiterate people for last 60 years. But nowadays some of them are getting it back in a not so pleasant way. Lets carry on with positive discussions on yoga.[/QUOTE]

I’m sorry, I don’t see the non positive words in my response? I’m certainly not condoning any kind of oppression when I suggest that yogis continue to learn from their practice their whole lives, but that is my honest opinion. I think everyone, whether a practictioner of yoga or not continues to learn always, integrating each new interaction and life event into the being.
I don’t know how my words led you to believe that I was offering any kind of negativity? But I’m certainly willing to try to understand why/what I said that was not positive if you would please clarify?


#40

[QUOTE=whitecrowyoga;69631]I have taken both online and traditional live training, and I’ve gotten a lot out of both. I think you need some hands-on training, but I also think home study and online training has a place. I took the online training from Paul and Marie Jerard and found it exceptional.[/QUOTE]

I know your answer wasn’t directed at me, but I found it helpful, thank you.