Downward dog help


#21

Hugh improvement Aaron. Yes, just the reach with the forehead toward the floor and you a cleared for take off. Keep breathing.

peace,
siva


#22

I thought I’d update y’all on my downward dog practice. I saw consistent improvement, but unfortunately with me graduating this year, the last few weeks of school I just didn’t have the time or energy to practice. That being said, as soon as school was over I got right back into it and after a week this is where I’m at. Not quite where I left things off, but I think it is looking good. To be honest I think the hardest thing at this point is just keeping my damn head down :stuck_out_tongue:

Any thoughts or comments?


#23

aaron,

You’re improving, but yes, you have to drive the head down. Turn the armpits down harder, spread the scapulae and squeeze those ribs and abs up against the ceiling… Don’t let them hang down, slacken.

But first, it’s ok you’re heels are not down, but it looks like you are perched on your toes and the outside of your foot: the force of your weight wrapping around the outside of the leg, engaging your hamstrings, up into your ass and lower-back. Do the opposite. Turn inward in your hips sockets and drive your weight down through the insides of the thighs, inside the foot and out through the heels, with the knees straight.

When you make that turn in your hips and legs and drive down, suddenly, your head and armpits will follow easily.

siva


#24

Hello Aaron,

Can you tell me, is there a reason you’re not bending your knees in this pose at this point in your practice?

Can you tell me what landmarks you are using to determine the width of your hands and feet from each other?

What is the difference (for you) between doing and allowing in your practice of asana and which of these are you employing in the neck?

What poses are you incorporating into your practice to further open your hamstrings?

What is your understanding of the actions in shoulders when they are weight-bearing?

gordon


#25

Try keeping your feet hip width and parallel.

Bend your knees a bit so that it is easier to turn the sit bones up…making a nice long diagonal with your back.

Release your head down…so that your neck is in line with the rest of your back.

Spread your fingers ,hands shoulder width and keep all the finger bases down on the mat (thumb and first finger need to be down…it looks like yours are lifting)

I totally disagree with siva who is say to “drive” and "harder"etc…DO NOT force !!!
Yoga is non-harming and downward dog does not need to be hard(difficult-hard or ridged-hard) it should be an easy, soft, opening place to be with long, full fluid breath.

I will be interested in the answers you have for Gordon…he usually give very useful tips.

How are you getting into DD?..via sunsalutation? which sunsalutation?

Try doing some simple hamstring stretches…trying lying on your back, lift one leg up,use a strap (or long towel) over your foot so that you can gently draw your leg in stretching the hamstrings without your head or shoulders lifting off the floor.

Hope this helps.


#26

Hi Aaron,

FYI: seems you have a kyphotic spine. That means a rounded back with the curve extending below T12. Don’t worry, you’re young and the progress you’ve made shows your flexible. I would recommend back bends to improve extension (especially in your lower back) and allow you to keep a straighter back in DD.

Best Wishes


#27

[QUOTE=yogacambodia;63417]

I totally disagree with siva who is say to “drive” and "harder"etc…DO NOT force !!!
Yoga is non-harming and downward dog does not need to be hard(difficult-hard or ridged-hard) it should be an easy, soft, opening place to be with long, full fluid breath.[/QUOTE]

Cambodia,

I agree there is a time for less force and more patience, but in Aaron’s case, action is needed and NOT passivity. “Drive,” and “harder” apply to concentration, focus and direction, determination, resolve, etc. “Easy” and “soft” are not working for him.

Aaron,

As you like and good luck, but you have to crank it buddy. Sometimes you even have to fight for it.

Also, explore alternating DD on one leg and then the other (the opposite leg extended up behind you).

peace,
siva


#28

[QUOTE=siva;63455]Cambodia,

I agree there is a time for less force and more patience, but in Aaron’s case, action is needed and NOT passivity. “Drive,” and “harder” apply to concentration, focus and direction, determination, resolve, etc. “Easy” and “soft” are not working for him.

Aaron,

As you like and good luck, but you have to crank it buddy. Sometimes you even have to fight for it.

Also, explore alternating DD on one leg and then the other (the opposite leg extended up behind you).

peace,
siva[/QUOTE]

I think Siva is right


#29

“Right” ?


#30

[QUOTE=yogaera;63459]I think Siva is right[/QUOTE]

Om bolo Sad Guru Sivananda.
Om bolo Sri Vishnu Devananda.
Jai!

siva


#31

Well Aaronitron there is nice improvement in your pose and i don’t think there’s more suggestion to be given but if you wish i would suggest try chakrasana before the dog’s pose as this asana gives flexibility and strength to your spine and back muscles and might help in your dog pose. You might search the internet on how to perform this,precautionary measures and its effect. If you find this posture difficult to perform i would rather suggest follow the experts advice as given in this forum.


#32

If you need help doing the Downward Dog pose, you can refer to this article http://bit.ly/2mT6OV6. It helped me when I needed to know about this pose.