Meditation urge from asanas


#1

Hi,

Not looking for an answer or confirmation. But over the last 6 months I have felt
A desire to begin meditating.
I have been doing Vinyasa Flows for about 3 years.
About 6 months ago I began feeling a need to meditate.
Recently I have started a Kirtan Kriya chant meditation.
Maybe it’s because of my new found interest in all things Yogic and reading about different things.
But I have felt a pull to go deeper spiritually.
I have no teacher pushing me in this direction. Just have felt the urge.

Anyone else out there have this experience.

Namaste


#2

[QUOTE=shumanfoo;86172]Hi,

Not looking for an answer or confirmation. But over the last 6 months I have felt
A desire to begin meditating.
I have been doing Vinyasa Flows for about 3 years.
About 6 months ago I began feeling a need to meditate.
Recently I have started a Kirtan Kriya chant meditation.
Maybe it’s because of my new found interest in all things Yogic and reading about different things.
But I have felt a pull to go deeper spiritually.
I have no teacher pushing me in this direction. Just have felt the urge.

Anyone else out there have this experience.

Namaste[/QUOTE]

Hello I am a newbie at yoga, I’ve just started my second year, but, like you, I started to look in to meditation and began a simple daily routine a couple of weeks ago. I’m now watching my breathing more during yoga and doing meditation practice during savasana.


#3

Excellent!


#4

Meditation can not be taught technically and it is realized only when you are ready for it. This is exactly what is happening here. Yoga practice makes you ready to move towards it.


#5

This was how my practice initially began. I had a book with asanas in it, and then shortly after I was freewriting in my journal and contemplating the world with a clear mind for the first time ever, followed by silent sitting and breathing. It was like maaagic.


#6

Wonderful to hear Shumanfoo :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=SohamYogaStudio;86206]Meditation can not be taught technically and it is realized only when you are ready for it…[/QUOTE]

Not at all so.


#7

Great to see that shumanfoo, the river is bound to flow back to the ocean :wink:

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#8

The karmic action unfolds, tracing backwards, cause and effect; it happen from a desire that arose from a thought that popped into consciousness spontaneously, unfolding so quickly and being so close to the happening we like to take credit for it. I like what InnerAthlete once said, the asana hooks em’s.


#9

I, too, have felt an urge to meditate. My attempts at it have been awkward. I need like a timer or something. I have been doing Hot Vinyasa for almost two years. I have also been reading several books on Buddhism. Some of them have been helpful while others are WAY up in the clouds and do not seem relevant to my life. If you are getting divorced like me, I found the book, “Storms Can’t Hurt the Sky” very helpful. I am trying to find books written by normal people living their normal lives (read-not a monk) and how they deal with day-to-day stuff using Buddhist principles and view points.


#10

Chezron. There is a meditation called a Kirtan Kriya. It involves a simple chant. There is a free App from the App Store of the same name. It has explanations and a timer that moves you through the different parts. I have found this very helpful. Hope this is a help to you.


#11

That is fantastic! I find that I like to meditate after my asanas although most do it before. Regardless, my days run so much more smoothly when I take the time to meditate! So happy that you have found this joy as well shumanfoo!

“You should sit in meditation for twenty minutes every day — unless you’re too busy. Then you should sit for an hour.” -Zen proverb


#12

[QUOTE=chezron;86578]I, too, have felt an urge to meditate. My attempts at it have been awkward. I need like a timer or something. I have been doing Hot Vinyasa for almost two years. I have also been reading several books on Buddhism. Some of them have been helpful while others are WAY up in the clouds and do not seem relevant to my life. If you are getting divorced like me, I found the book, “Storms Can’t Hurt the Sky” very helpful. I am trying to find books written by normal people living their normal lives (read-not a monk) and how they deal with day-to-day stuff using Buddhist principles and view points.[/QUOTE]

It took me some time to find what was right for me. I had a hard time with silent meditation so I found some apps with guided or music. The most important thing is to not be too hard on yourself. It will come. :wink: