New to meditation


#1

I’ve been practising yoga for around 6 months now and I am gradually getting into the spiritual side of practice.

In particular I want to meditate because my mind is very tired and can’t be at rest.

Do you have any tips for an inexperienced person who’s mind is in a constant chatter? It’s like an analogue radio when someone scans through the frequencies. For now, all I want to be able to do is quieten it. I’ve booked a weekend introductory course at the Cambridge Buddhist Centre to learn more about meditation. :slight_smile:


#2

[QUOTE=inkratlet;83121]I’ve been practising yoga for around 6 months now and I am gradually getting into the spiritual side of practice.

In particular I want to meditate because my mind is very tired and can’t be at rest.

Do you have any tips for an inexperienced person who’s mind is in a constant chatter? It’s like an analogue radio when someone scans through the frequencies. For now, all I want to be able to do is quieten it. I’ve booked a weekend introductory course at the Cambridge Buddhist Centre to learn more about meditation. :)[/QUOTE]

The best thing would be for you to start using brainwave sinchronisation software. Its used to achieve Deep Meditation Fast.

Deep Meditation Fast

Did you know that people who meditate are much happier and healthier than everyone else? It’s true. And they have greatly extended life spans, too. As a matter of fact, there have been numerous studies showing that meditation dramatically reduces, and even reverses disease of all types.

But the benefits of meditation don’t stop there. Studies also show that experienced meditators -those who are able to achieve the deepest levels of meditative states - are able to tap into dormant levels of brain function they never thought possible -levels of function that exist in each and every one of us -resulting in increased intelligence and moving us closer to answering life’s mysterious questions.

Upon closer examination of meditators’ brains, they consistently show to function at a superior level than the average person’s on every single test, measurement, and assessment generated among the scientific community. In fact, if you do your homework, you’ll discover that many of history’s greatest inventors, philosophers, and scientists received their revolutionary, future -changing ideas during their daily meditation sessions.

Just imagine what you could do if you had access to these deep levels of meditation!

One of the reasons meditators experience greater levels of happiness and health is because meditation significantly increases the brain’s production of several euphoric chemicals -the same chemicals that flow through your bloodstream on those days when you’ve never felt better. Even more, meditation allows these euphoric brain chemicals to be produced constantly.

Meditators also sleep much better than those who don’t meditate. As a matter of fact, they have shown to need fewer hours of sleep every night because their minds and bodies are completely refreshed and rejuvenated during their highly pleasurable meditation sessions.

Meditation is also known for providing its practitioners with superior mental and emotional health, it rids our minds of subconscious layers of anger, depression, anxiety, fear, phobias, and sadness, and produces a perfect mental and emotional balance.

People who meditate are also known to have more friends, maintain healthier relationships, and feel a great deal more satisfied and content with their lives.

With these studies in mind, Equisync’s revolutionary, multi-layered, multi-tiered approach was born. EquiSync is designed to synchronize and harmonize your brainwaves while allowing you access to the deepest, most pleasurable, and most beneficial states of meditation, much faster than the traditional route.

Many psychologists, doctors, teachers, and other professionals have endorsed the technology while personally taking advantage of the limitless benefits that accompany Equisync’s precisely designed brainwave synchronization technology. It is such a profound field of study that many of the metaphysical benefits, those beyond our current scientific measure and technological & philosophical understanding, have yet to be discovered.

What Happens When You Use Equisync

The brainwave entrainment from EquiSync offers your nervous system a super fertile atmosphere, triggering enormously positive transformations in your body and brain. Just as higher levels of exercise force your body to strengthen and develop, the higher levels of neurostimulation provided through Equisync audio technology forces your nervous system into optimal performance.

How Your Body Responds to Equisync’s Safe and Precisely Designed Stimulus

Your entire nervous system and brain are transformed and reorganized on a higher level. A foundation of new neural pathways is constructed. Your left and right brain hemispheres communicate to a degree never seen before, producing what doctors call whole brain functioning. And, of course, there’s all the wonderful benefits that we discussed earlier. Science really has only just discovered the tip of the iceberg in relation to this powerful, life-changing technology.

If you try it normal way withough brainwave software, it will take you like 10 years to master.

Its the fastest way and you will start to benefit directly.

Only thing you need is the equisinc the software and stereo headphones.

http://www.eocinstitute.org/meditation_s/45.htm
http://www.eocinstitute.org/anxiety_depression_addiction_worry_fear_s/49.htm

If you listen it every day for a hour your mind chatter will disapear forever. I am giving you my word.

Here some more interesting info about the brainwaves.

http://www.causeof.org/brainwaves.htm


#3

[QUOTE=inkratlet;83121]I’ve been practising yoga for around 6 months now and I am gradually getting into the spiritual side of practice.

In particular I want to meditate because my mind is very tired and can’t be at rest.

Do you have any tips for an inexperienced person who’s mind is in a constant chatter? It’s like an analogue radio when someone scans through the frequencies. For now, all I want to be able to do is quieten it. I’ve booked a weekend introductory course at the Cambridge Buddhist Centre to learn more about meditation. :)[/QUOTE]

[B][I]1. Kapalbhati Pranayama
2. Nadi Shodhana
3. Ujjayi Pranayama
4. Practicing of kumbhak (for as long as comfortable)

You can kill the mind with these and all that is left is ‘meditation’.[/I][/B]


#4

[QUOTE=inkratlet;83121]I’ve been practising yoga for around 6 months now and I am gradually getting into the spiritual side of practice.
For now, all I want to be able to do is quieten it. I’ve booked a weekend introductory course at the Cambridge Buddhist Centre to learn more about meditation. :)[/QUOTE]

Buddhist center is a good pace to learn meditation;)
Especially, contemporary Buddhism traditions, like Kadampha


#5

[QUOTE=omshanti;83575][B][I]

  1. Kapalbhati Pranayama
  2. Nadi Shodhana
  3. Ujjayi Pranayama
  4. Practicing of kumbhak (for as long as comfortable)

You can kill the mind with these and all that is left is ‘meditation’.[/I][/B][/QUOTE]

Thank you for the link on the Yoga Sutras, would you mind posting links to these techniques mentioned above? Your judgement on the Yoga Sutras link is sound so this request is made due to that.


#6

Every aspect of the eight limbs of the Yogic sciences has a particular function designed in assisting the process of meditation.


#7

Let me expand on Ray’s statement.

Asanas eliminate the inertia of the physical body so that the awareness locked up there can be released. Pranayama takes it from there and cultivates higher awareness, first by controlling the subtle air and later, even more subtle life-force, the prana. While practicing the two together, yamas ensure protection against obstacles emerging from external events; and niyamas put a firewall around the inherent human weaknesses. That’s why these 4 limbs are to be practiced simultaneously to build a foundation for the higher states.

The preparation for the higher states begins by developing the skills of concentration, meditation and contemplation in stages using the external, material environment. Concentration needs efforts and a continuous act of withdrawing from diversions to focus. Meditation is insightful, which springs up naturally and eliminates efforts. Concentration involves senses, meditation involves the mind and thinking. The turbulent thinking is suspended and concentration does not need any efforts. Finally, contemplation is when one is so absorbed in the task on hand that there is no awareness of “doing” the task (task and the doer becoming one).

Pratyahara is that crucial stage when we can consciously move our external orientation inwards. Then the skills of concentration, meditation and contemplation lead to dharana, dhyana and Samadhi respectively. If one places “meditation” on this total map, it will mean ‘effortless concentration’ as a skill and a self-absorbed inner state. The important message from this (often overlooked) is that one is not meditating only when sitting still and eyes closed. Total absorption in any task on hand is meditation too.


#8

[QUOTE=Seeking;83628]Thank you for the link on the Yoga Sutras, would you mind posting links to these techniques mentioned above? Your judgement on the Yoga Sutras link is sound so this request is made due to that.[/QUOTE]

Seeking,

This book is excellent for the learning of the pranayamas we mentioned.
I hope you find it to your satisfaction.

Jai Shiva

http://brihaspati.net/downloads/Light_on_Pranayama__B_K_S_Iyengar.pdf


#9

This looks very informative. Thank you once again.

[QUOTE=omshanti;83651]Seeking,

This book is excellent for the learning of the pranayamas we mentioned.
I hope you find it to your satisfaction.

Jai Shiva

http://brihaspati.net/downloads/Light_on_Pranayama__B_K_S_Iyengar.pdf[/QUOTE]


#10

Your temperament will be a big factor in determining which type of meditation practice will most benefit you at the beginning and in the long run.

The Buddhist center is a good place to start.


#11

Once you commit to meditating on a regular basis it surely helps. I agree with the Bhuddist temple idea - because you are more easily guided and when you’re surrounded by the right environment, it’s a lot easier to fall into the ‘trance’


#12

The only meditation that ever worked for me is Transcendental Meditation. When a meditation requires effort, it keeps the mind active, but TM lets the awareness settle deep inside. I really recommend it–have been doing it for years and the results continue to accumulate. Easy to do even in an active life. Recent book called “Maharishi’s Yoga” explains its role in Yoga.


#13

I am doing meditation from 2years. I observe breath in meditation with closed eyes. If thoughts come just neglect and come to breath and don’t control the breath just observe it.


#14

In truth, every time we sit for meditation, we are all new to meditation. Otherwise, we are not really meditating, we are practicing at meditation. This urge arises from deep within our epicenter and calls our soul to wholly center, to open up, to bloom exponentially, to expand beyond the limits of oneself… and awaken.

Is it really this simple? No, hardly so easy to grasp… but each step is as if it were the very first step, each breath is as if it were the very first breath. In my own small experiences, this is what meditation births (spontaneously and beatifically).

Learning to attune to the presence of the Spirit, awakened in this very moment, is the greatest of joys. Methods are many, techniques are numerous but the essence is of one singularity. Dive deeply and in sheer abandonment, embrace your existence without reservation, dear friend. Now is the time and here is the place to find infinite bliss. :cool:


#15

Rituals.

I do it every morning at the same time.


#16

Contact Amaravati Buddhist Centre outside London. It’s a monastery but you can stay there for a week, or just a weekend, as a lay guest and meditate as much or as little as it suits you. You can get advice if you want it. There is no charge but you will have to do some work to support the community, not much.
It is quiet. In my experience the mind calms down naturally when stimulation is removed (the sediment settles when you stop stirring the stick). This is a natural process, there is no technique necessary. You will see the difference when you meditate there.
These Buddhists don’t advise people to try and quieten the mind, that “ambition” only sets up more tension and more activity. Watch the mind, and after a while, in a peaceful setting, watch it subside.
Most people who go there from busy lives tend to sleep a lot when they first arrive because there is no stimulation to keep them awake and they are exhausted anyway, but that passes. Stay a week if you can.


#17

I used to feel the same way as you feel today. Meditation is about letting go. Let go of your feelings and let your spirit wander freely.

I agree, Budhist Centre is the best place to get yourself surrounded by like-minded people and you should definetely go for it. But, wouldn’t socializing with others again bring the same chaotic mindset back?

I think you should experiment with both (solo and group) meditation and then decide, which one uplifts your spirit.

I am also a yoga student and currently learning connecting the spirtual threads.