Kundalini and the Breathless State


#55

[QUOTE=Avatar186;78562]Discussion of ideas is greater than discussion of persons.

Discuss things impersonally. Discuss the personal in an impersonal manner.

[/QUOTE]
Point taken. I apologize for lashing out. I shared some very personal experiences and my ego did not appreciate them being questioned. I have received similar responses from friends that have no understanding of yoga and so some of my reaction was displacement. I’m not trying to excuse my behavior, just explain it. It is obvious Suhas Tambe has a lot of knowledge about yoga, thus his contemplations are desired and could prove to be very valuable to our paths.

I would love to hear more about your systematic approach
I prefer to hear what others have directly experienced rather than theory.

You and I think alike. First off, I don’t feel that I am qualified to teach anything except what I have done and my experiences.

I believe Siddhasana is extremely important and far superior to Padmasana (full lotus) pose. The first meditation course that I took (that ultimately ended up being a dead end of my spiritual practice for a few years), just said keep your back straight and practice Shambhavi Mudra. The instructor taught that it didn’t matter whether we sat on the floor or in a chair. I did feel some bliss created by some buzzing and throbbing in my Ajna, but obviously not enough because I lost interest in the practice.

A few months ago after reading Ennio’s Kriya book, I started practicing kriyas with my legs folded in front of me but not in Siddhasana. I made it a habit to read a few kundalini lessons a day from AYPsite.org. When I got to lesson 75 and read about Siddhasana, I tried it and immediately had an experience. I remember doing basic Kriya breaths which consisted of a few Moo squeezes, taking the breath up the spinal column imagining the breath changing colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple in Ajna) as it passes through the chakras, and holding the breath in Ajna for a few moments.

It only took one or two breaths and I started seeing fireworks in my Ajna. Once again this made me excited and I thought oh good I’m going to have an experience. But a couple of explosions was it and I again thought ?you blew it you fool, you let the mind in.? I later realized that the importance of the experience was conveyed. I was not sitting correctly ? the heel pressing into the perineum is extremely important to stimulate the Muladhara to send prana up the sushumna.

I was an avid cyclists for over a decade bicycling up mountains literally every day. I believe this thickened or strengthened my tendons, ligaments, cartilage or something so much that my knees are not that flexible. When I started taking yoga classes, I noticed that most people have far more flexibility in their knees than I do. Women are naturally more flexible but I was jealous of the men that could perform Padmasana (full lotus). I was so infatuated with the attainment of that pose that I remember traveling through Thailand and looking at the Buddha statues thinking why isn’t he in full lotus? He meditated all the time and had to be flexible enough. After this experience it dawned on me. Siddhasana ? Siddhartha Gautama was the Buddha’s real name. The pose is named after him. And of course he could easily sit in full lotus. He sat in Siddhasana not because he needed the Muladhara stimulus any more. Everything was on and open in his body. He sat in Siddhasana because it is the most powerful seated pose to awaken the kundalini. He wanted his followers to mimic him.

In retrospect, it is a blessing that my knees were not flexible enough to sit in Padmasana because I would not have turned my kundalini on if I could. I still cannot sit in Siddhasana correctly. I have one heel pressed fairly hard into my perineum but the other is not flexible enough to complete the circuit and press into my pubic bone.

It is my belief that some teachings have you do Maha Mudra in the forward bend posture because when you reach forward to touch your toes, you push your heel more firmly into your perineum. This sends prana up the sushumna. Most people reading this probably practice Siddhasana correctly. I didn’t and had no clue about the importance of it until this experience. I went back and read the books and sure enough they all explicitly said do this. Upon reading them, my thoughts always were ok, sit with the spine straight up. This experience has made me pay far more attention to all the nuances of everything to make sure that I am not missing a key component.

Another aspect that I think contributed to my awakening is that I haven’t blown my load in over two months. In all seriousness, I think there is a connection. I have read that sperm has the same make up of bindu, so it drains your life energy when it is expended or something like that. I have a thought (misplaced???) that the newly created sperm are going to need some energy to fulfill their mission so they help themselves to the prana that is suppose to be rising up and opening up your chakras. Or maybe the sperm is created out of the prana itself depleting it for hours or days what should be going up your sushumna. Yogananda says that sexuality is the greatest impediment to a males spiritual progress.

One of my favorite Lahiri quotes was when asked when in his yoga path did he stop thinking about sex; He replied that he will stop thinking about sex when he is six feet under. Reading that made me love Lahiri even more and shows you that even the great masters succumb to worldly temptations. Another great Lahiri quote is ?Nobody is a sinner; the mind itself is the sinner when it becomes outward away from the Kutastha.?

That said I have not curtailed my sexual activities at all. A friend loaned me Mantak Chia’s book the multiorgasmic man right about the time I started practicing Kriya. The AYPsite has a section on Tantra that teaches the same thing free. The tantric technique of separating orgasm from ejaculation is just Vajroli mudra and Uddiyana bandha. I’ve learned that the Uddiyana part is more important than the Vajroli. When you pass the point of no return, you employ Vajroli mudra and exhale slowly into Uddiyana and then exhale again and then exhale again (for a total of 3 times) and finally stretch like a cat taking the energy up the spine. I still have small mistakes but I’m not ready to give up that part of my life yet. Until you master the technique it is good to press into the perineum with your thumb and fingers as a backup. I don’t think I’ve had a full ejaculation in 4 months. I feel an incredible amount of current in missionary position with lips or tongues engaged and also hip to hip contact feels likes sparks going off. Many times during the act I get dizzy with bliss and have had to stop and rest for awhile. I also enjoy sex so much more because you stop focusing on the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow and instead just focus on being with another divine spirit. I don’t know for sure but I think sex has actually aided in my awakening.

The whole thing about yoga, sex and abstinence has to be one of the greatest ironies of all. (The Christian and Catholic religions are a great irony to me as well) Don’t spill your seed young man! Yet at the same time you’re suppose to rub what physiologically is similar to a clitoris on your nasal septum for hours on end while internally performing Nadi Shohana? When I first read about this I thought you can’t make this stuff up. I remember when I first listened to Yogiraj Siddhanath talk about spending 12 hours at a clip performing Nadi Shohana to balance his nadis. At first I thought this guy’s dedication is amazing. Now I wonder if it is like playing with yourself in a state of orgasmic bliss for 12 hours.

And I wish I had a systematic approach but I feel like I am just winging it. At this point I’m going to dance with the one that brought me to the prom and that is Satyananda. I’ve been doing his exercises to open my Ajna. Somedays I feels blissful pulses and others a peaceful bliss.

The exercises are Jala neti everyday. Trataka on a candle ? I do 5 ? 15 minutes depending on how I feel ? never any pressure to do more. Shambhavi mudra ? but I always try to go into Shambhavi and kechari whenever I can so this is no new practice. I’m in kechari most of the day. The main workhorse is Nadi Shodhana for as long as you can. Motoyama would get up at 4 in the morning and do it for an hour. I don’t think I’ve done more than 20 in my life at a time so I guess I’m slacking in this department. Maybe in a week or two I will become more diligent and practice Nadi Shohana for 30 minutes and basic Kriyas for 30 minutes for an hour total. Right now I am content to relax and meditate in breathlessness. I realize that I’m resting on my laurels so to speak but I get a lot of bliss out of it. I know that this is not the end goal.

Satyananda has a advanced form of Nadi Shohana where the inhale / kumbhaka / exhale / kumbhaka time is 1/2/2/1. You go into Jalahandra Bandha and Mula Bandha on the inhale kumbhaka and Maha Mudra on the exhale kumbhaka. (Maha Mudra is Jalahandra, Uddiyana, and Mula Bandha all together).

I also am very dedicated to achieving kechari stage 2 and am now doing about 500 Talabya’s a day in addition to some tongue circles, stretching and milking exercises. I have noticed a change in the ability of my tongue. It is starting to curl more and the frenulum tendon is no longer taut and what is limiting my progress. I therefore am going to stop cutting my frenulum for the time being as I don’t think this is the limiting factor any more.

I also practice a fairly advanced form of Sivananda Yoga Asanas several times a week that I will explain in detail later if someone expresses interest

Yoga has six different schools and several variations and approaches. Patanajli documented a path called Raja Yoga, (royal yoga). It is so called for a reason. At the base of Vedic literature is a concept of the subtle manifesting in gross in successive subtle-gross casscade. Corollary is that (relatively) subtle is a cause of the gross. The spiritual path of self-realization works in the reverse. By experiencing the gross one gains knowledge of the subtle. Corollary is - the subtle is the best position to control the gross.

It would not be wise for me not to participate in a game of yoga jeopardy with you.

This bears on the khechari in two ways. Can the practice deliver the ultimate state of samadhi? Potentially, it does. How durable that would be? results will be quicker but the change agents being predominantly physical, less durable than bhakti, dhyana or raja.

When I first started going breathless I noticed a difference of intensity when I meditated. When I would go breathless from breath of fire there was a lot more turbulence floating around in my diaphragm than when I would go breathless from using a Maha Mudra techniques which is stretching out the diaphragm. Again the tissue in the diaphragm feel like reeds in the ocean and as water moves over them they all start to move one way, the breath hits the back of the diaphragm and then they all start to move the other way. I hope my metaphor is conveying what I feel in my body correctly. I remembering thinking at the time that the slightest bit of movement has to be completely stopped even on a microscopic level for me to reach samadhi. And there is no way that is possible with completely sealing off the nasal passage.

Nowadays I don’t feel much difference in my breathlessness because it happens all the time and I don’t really control it. I wake up in the morning and I’m breathing. I look down at my diaphragm and it flutters for a few seconds and stops. And so I know that the autonomous nervous systems makes you breathe and as soon as my consciousness takes over, the diaphragm stops with no effort on my part. I wonder if this is why advanced yogis don’t sleep. There is something in the breath that they don’t want pumped inside them when they sleep?

This is from Yogiraj Gurunath Siddhanath’s book Babaji, the lightning standing still page 228:

Those who have mastered this mudra can penetrate their tongue up the hollow of the throat to near the midpoint of the eyebrows. Above this is the third ventricle in the brain, which is like an inverted well, dropping the nectar on the tongue.
All people initiated into advanced Kriya Yoga can avail of this nectar to retard the aging process of their body cells and simultaneously attain the state of samadhi. We must understand that in the true Kriya Yoga teachings, the khechari mudra is a must because it blocks the ida-pingala channels and assists in the opening of the sushumna channel, forcing the pranic breath to enter the central channel and bestow self-realization on the practitioner of Kriya Yoga. It is also one of the mudras, which sets apart the true Kriya Yoga teachings from that of other teachings of yoga which are not the true Kriya Yoga. In all Kriya Yoga practices, the khechari mudra is always used to ensure the rapidity of spiritual evolution.

Here are some testimonials of space cadets that put a natural or should I say organic version of the amrit, DMT or in this case it is called ayahuasca into their body ? you have to cut and paste the link ? I don’t have enough posts yet to post links:

templeofthewayoflight.org/video-testimonials/gallery

I have no interest in the thoughts of what a doctor might think. I wont see a doctor unless I have a broken bone or something like that. I don’t like who writes the textbooks that the doctors ?learn? from. I would be more concerned if I was the one stopping my breath all the time but I’m not. Something has changed in my body and I have no control over it.

I just spent several hours writing the above information so I hope somebody benefits from it.


#56

I most certainly do appreciate the time you took posting this.

I know exactly how long it takes to compose what you did and often my compositions take place during separate times of the day when I have the freedom to type so sometimes if it seems like I just came back to a thought it is because I did.

Something has grown in you I can tell the writing is good for you keep it up. Your experiences have much to offer to those who can understand them and are a comfort to others who are experiencing similar things. You are not alone.


#57

[QUOTE=Seeking;78618]I know exactly how long it takes to compose what you did [/QUOTE]

I should have spent a few more minutes proofreading what I wrote because I made several errors in my post. One of them is relatively easy to spot and it is a double negative.

It would not be wise for me not to participate in a game

obviously one of the “not”'s should be dropped.

The other:

And there is no way that is possible with completely sealing off the nasal passage.

“With” should read “without”. This one is more important because it is not as obvious and changes the meaning of what I meant. This came from understanding when I was meditating . People throw the word samadhi around . I have read the Dhammapada and so know that the Buddha talked about 8 levels of samadhi. I don’t know what each one entails. I remember reading the Buddha say that when you slow the mind down enough you can actually see and feel your thoughts coming at you like waves.

Sri Yukteswar (Yogananda’s guru) said you gain far more knowledge and understanding from meditation than you will ever learn from a book. I remember one night reading Sri Ramakrishna saying that you don’t have the capability nor the capacity to understand what you are with your mind or your limited senses. And so you must transcend the mind to have this understanding.

One inspiring quote from Ramakrishna that I keep going back to is being in this body is like being a fish trapped in a bucket and when I meditate it feels like somebody dumped the bucket into the Ganges River and let me free. All these great masters say that understanding comes from practice.

Here is Satyananda talking about yoga and kundalini. Listening to Satyananda brings me as much joy as listening to Lahiri or Yogananda would. He starts talking about Hatha yoga and the mechanics of kundalini around 10:30 and it ends like a batman episode. If anybody knows where part 2 is, please let me know.

What God has done is take a piece of himself and put it in this prison cell that we call a body. There is full understanding available to us but not before we pick a few locks and solve a few riddles that shut down what is trapping us in this body and limiting our abilities of access to this understanding. Our senses and our mind want us to chase women and gold but the kingdom of heaven resides within.

“Be Still and Know that I am God.” Most yogi’s rightfully believe that this quote means still yourself in meditation. But the requirements of the body without a completely turned on kundalini system will never allow this to happen. Breathing and digestion require the body to move. Jesus said you must be born again. When you are born you go from living off of the embryonic fluid to breathing air and needing food and water. Being born again (the spiritual birth) will mitigate the necessity of air, food and water. And of course we all know that the birth he is referring to is activating kundalini and removing any blockages so our kundalini is fully operational. Then we will live off the prana and wont need food, water, or oxygen.

The only thing that I have ever read that stops the necessity of food and water is kechari.

Faith and beliefs use the mind The mind and senses are traps. You can never get to where you want to go using them. You will at best receive transitory pleasures that ultimately end in bondage.

So you must renounce them and stop putting things into the body that stimulate it or require it to do chores so that the body can shut down. Then the real you can step out from behind the curtain. The reason I bring this point up is because when I first started going breathless I could feel different levels of intensity in my meditations. When there was still the turmoil of movement floating around in my diaphragm, there was still thought. It was far less than in the ordinary state of breathing but I could tell that the goal was to stop all movement which definitely would require a complete seal of the nasal passage. Then I could achieve a state of mind in a few minutes that would take hours within the limits of my present capabilities.

Even if I stopped breathing and remained motionless for 8 hours, microscopically there was still going to be movement in the diaphragm coming from the open nasal passage. If you could seal off all of the openings to the body and get an air tight seal, you could apply pressure internally into the system and slow everything down in possibly minutes as to opposed to 8 hours or who knows how long it would take. This would require a tongue long enough to seal off the nasal passage.

The thought has come to me that if I completely stop every slightest bit of movement in the diaphragm and the mind is completely shut off, does the circulatory system then become the next thing that you have to shut down? When there is food in the system, the body has work to do and must move. Which again takes us back to kechari because the Amrit that is secreted when the pituitary and pineal glands are stimulated, allows the body to live without food and water ending the necessity to eliminate anything.

Since we can never understand what God is through our limited senses, it makes more sense to spend your time trying to understand the mechanical aspects of the body that allow us to shut down what is limiting our perception, than using this mind to gain an understanding of what samadhi or God is through book knowledge. One liberating thing about where I’m at is the concept of Hell becomes a joke. We’re already trapped in a prison. I guess it could be worse if we were put into a vehicle that needed more external things to keep it functioning properly, had less ability to obtain them and had even more senses and mental activity to experience the discord. One would start thinking that God is a sadist and I don’t believe that.

And so to reach the final stage of enlightenment and be still, your electrical system must be completely turned on with all your nadis supplying energy to every pore in your body so these parts of the body do not require sustenance from the other system (circulatory) that runs your body on water, food and air.

Since kechari is so important, tongue stretching exercises should be done on a daily basis. That means Talabya, tongue circles, practice sticking it out in every direction, stretching with the hands and milking with the hands should be done on a daily basis. If anybody can think of any other exercises that could be helpful, I’m all ears.

Again I hope somebody can derive some benefit from my ramblings.


#58

?Be Still and Know that I am God.?

Initially, my experience was heavily grounded in the physical practices. Then, the challenge of asanas wasn’t stilling the body but doing impossible body oregami. The Masters’ teachings taught me to look inside. The physique doesn’t “exist” unless so perceived. In fact, the senses are factory-built into our body-processors without which we can’t know and beyond which we don’t know. We have to still that which obstructs knowing - and that is sense-based perception.

When we talk about khechari mudra, breathlessness, kundalini force, meditative state and related things, we need to examine which are the causes and which the effects. Mudras, for example, are essentially physical but designed to calibrate subtle nadis and force-fields. Breathlessness is a state, an effect of some process that makes it redundant for sustaining life. But it is also a cause of stillness which facilitates the states of meditation and samadhi.

Stillness particularly is a state but most importantly it is a perceived state. Seen differently, and this is very important, if something is perceived to be ‘still’, it doesn’t matter if it is so, independent of perception. Trying to still the physical body is hence unnecessary. And impossible if we take to the levels of cells, molecules and electrons. It is for a reason that Patanjali mentioned “yoga is cessation of mind’s movements” and not body movements.

Patanjali has given one process of how to still the mind which has a break through point of pratyahara - non-attacment. When we perceive we unsettle the potential energy of the perceived object and that resonates in our senses to trigger thinking. When we think we get attached. If we learn not to perceive by setting aside the thinking process the mind is made non-attached and our core is still. The objects of the world have life within and life spells movements. By not attaching to it we achieve stillness which works on the primary cause.

Please dwell on this point of view.


#59

Genius. By setting aside the thinking process. Perfectly said. :slight_smile:


#61

You admit your challening me so actually you are saying that your ego challenged me and your ego also says it hurts my ego, do you see the superior ness here?

One ego tells the other he has an ego this is funny. Your ego could be correct and it is possible as even im not without ego. I wish you the best.


#62

Everyone makes it out to be it is just a tool we all use for expressing ourselves to one another.

It is a vehicle that’s all. When you drive your car do it well when you tailgate or you let go of the wheel and cause an accident then it becomes a problem.

Ego’s posting about other peoples ego problems or ego driven replies to an ego that is baiting another’s ego to get a rise makes me laugh. It is kind of funny really.

The only thing funnier is someone communicating that they have no ego now there is a real knee slapper, might as well say I am so superior that This I is no longer the the corrupt little shoddy I now is it i or is that I? Lol :smiley: Does anyone get that last Jab? Here is a hint there is a coconut demanding traveling false guru from india at the end of that jab.

Oh yes this fraud goes so far as to declare proudly with bloated belly and puffed up chest I have no ego! None at all! People actually believe this what an act.

So anyway Ok this shoddy little i is done amusing itself. Nothing wrong with having a healthy ego at all.

Having a condemning know it all ego well that’s different then you become very unpleasant to be around and that is a problem for you and everyone on the road.

The best we can do is transcend the ego in sadhana which is easily done and in doing so we also purify and clean the ego little by little scrape the rust off and make it a nice car to drive respectfully on the road of life with others.

Being devoid of ego in superconscious states is easy interacting with others on many different levels of possible receptivity without the EGO ah now there is a trick indeed.

When this I figures out how to talk to your I without the ego i will be sure to let U know.


#63

Good post.


#64

Ego= self identification

I am a unicorn. A bad ass unicorn. :slight_smile:


#65

[QUOTE=Suhas Tambe;78672]Initially, my experience was heavily grounded in the physical practices. Then, the challenge of asanas wasn’t stilling the body but doing impossible body oregami.
[/QUOTE]

I believe the purpose of the asanas is to open up the chakras, promote endurance, flexibility, and strength to prepare the body for long periods of meditation. I was first attracted to what I believe now is fluffy yoga that is designed more to promote presence, strength, endurance and flexibility. The Sivananda style that my instructor teaches lights up my body like a Christmas tree. I offered to explain my routine but nobody expressed interest and I don’t want to spend hours doing so if nobody cares to read about it.

The Masters’ teachings taught me to look inside. The physique doesn’t “exist” unless so perceived. In fact, the senses are factory-built into our body-processors without which we can’t know and beyond which we don’t know. We have to still that which obstructs knowing - and that is sense-based perception.

I whole heartedly agree, how do we still sense-based perception?

When we talk about khechari mudra, breathlessness, kundalini force, meditative state and related things, we need to examine which are the causes and which the effects. Mudras, for example, are essentially physical but designed to calibrate subtle nadis and force-fields. Breathlessness is a state, an effect of some process that makes it redundant for sustaining life. But it is also a cause of stillness which facilitates the states of meditation and samadhi.

I completely agree.

Stillness particularly is a state but most importantly it is a perceived state. Seen differently, and this is very important, if something is perceived to be ‘still’, it doesn’t matter if it is so, independent of perception. Trying to still the physical body is hence unnecessary. And impossible if we take to the levels of cells, molecules and electrons. It is for a reason that Patanjali mentioned “yoga is cessation of mind’s movements” and not body movements.

I most likely went overboard when I took it to a microscopic level, but the slightest movements give life to the mind. I agree that our experience is what we perceive it to be, not what is actually happening. After all, everything we experience in this world with our senses is maya. That said if we don’t have the ability to perceive ourselves as still, we must first still ourselves physically. I distinctly remember being in deep meditation and the thought came to me that if I wanted to go deeper I had to completely still my diaphragm. And again this would entail meditating for hours in complete stillness as the waves of air and tissue in my diaphragm slowly subsided. But I physically did not have the ability (sealing off the nasal passage) to still everything and so I could go deeper but not reach the ultimate goal. I keep thinking that if you can seal the nasal passage with the tongue, you can somehow put pressure into the diaphragm to help still it quicker. I don’t know the most effective way of doing that because I can’t seal the nasal passage yet.

Think of the ramifications of this. It is my belief that a baby is pure consciousness in the womb of its mother. The baby’s diaphragm is filled with fluid that stills the tissue in the diaphragm. As soon as it is born, it is given the “gift” of breath and the ego or mind comes alive filling it with thoughts and desires until it is “born again.”

There are several accounts in the bible of fasting such as Elijah, Moses and in particular Jesus (when he went into the desert ) who all fasted for 40 days. I don’t think Jesus would’ve done unnecessary acts. I know the Buddha tried the austerity bit and said this is not the path. That said most people would think that going without breath is an austere measure and speaking from experience I can say that I feel no lack. Does the yogi who has reached kechari stage 4 have the same view about food?

Taken from The Second Coming of Christ starting on page 170:

Through Kriya Yoga meditation, the consciousness is gradually transformed from identification with the inept and often treacherous physical body, with its love of breath and “bread,” to awareness of the inner astral body of self-renewing vibrant life energy, and thence to one’s ultimate nature as a soul image of God: ever-existing, ever-conscious, ever-new Bliss…

Deep samadhi meditation is possible only when all bodily functions are stilled. Proper diet and fasting are helpful in conditioning the body for this state of quiet and interiorization. Jesus acknowledged this principle by fasting to spiritualize his body and free his mind during his forty days in the wilderness.

To meditate when the stomach is empty is a good practice because the energy that runs the nervous system is not then as busy with bodily functions. Meditation after heavy meals sets up a tug-of-war between the body consciousness and the soul’s superconsciousness. With a full stomach, the heart, lungs, and digestive and nervous systems are all engaged in digesting food, burning carbon, and maintaining circulation to the lungs to rid the blood of carbon dioxide. This keeps the subconscious mind busy, which in turn injects its restlessness into the conscious mind. Such invasion of the consciousness precludes inner God-communion. But when the inner activities of the body are still, the heart is calm. When the heart is calm, the life current is switched off from the senses, and the mind is freed from restless thoughts to concentrate wholly on God.

People who habitually overeat and never fast harness the life force in their bodies to a relentless activity of burning carbon and cleansing venous blood, overworking the heart and keeping the five sense-telephones constantly active. Fasting in connection with meditation slows the activity in the muscles, heart, circulation, diaphragm, and lungs by denying carbon and chemicals to the blood, thus helping to draw the attention away from the body and its functions. Metaphysically, fasting helps to open the life-giving inner source of Cosmic Consciousness and Cosmic Energy.

Long fasting should never be undertaken without the guidance and direction of a competent preceptor. Long fast (that is, for more than one day a week, or three days once a month or every forty-five days – taking sufficient fluids) is not necessary in order to demonstrate the vital sustenance of Divine Power. Nourish the body and spirit with meditation.

Continuing from page 587:

So long as man’s mind and life force are tied to the senses, he is at work. It is when he learns to switch off the life-force currrents in the nerves that connect the mind to the senses that he attains the true inactive state of transcendental Spirit. If “inactivity” is the measure of proper Sabbath observance, therefore, only the yogi who has reached the savikalpa samadhi state, wherein all bodily activity is suspended in the ecstatic trance of God-union, can be truly said to honor that commmandment.

The Gita points out an even higher state: the ulitmate stage of divine communion, nirvikalpa samadhi, in which the yogi retains his conscious oneness with Spirit without necessarily suspending the outer activity

[B]
I cannot recommend Yogananda’s book[/B] The Second Coming of Christ – A revelatory commentary on the original teachings of Jesus [B]enough[/B]. Words cannot express how blessed I feel having this great soul’s knowledge about the ultimate truth at my fingertips. At my level of understanding, the bible is incomprehensible. It is like a complicated knot full of parables, allegories, metaphors, and similes that I have a hard time unraveling. In addition to this you have to contend with translational issues or mistakes (obviously the bible was not originally written in the English language) and what I believe is purposeful obfuscation. That would entail a conspiracy though and so that can’t be true, right? Everyone knows that all conspiracy theories are the ramblings of kooks ;o)

Patanjali has given one process of how to still the mind which has a break through point of pratyahara - non-attachment. When we perceive we unsettle the potential energy of the perceived object and that resonates in our senses to trigger thinking.

Perceive - to become aware of, know, or identify by means of the sense.

When something stimulates us the energy of the stimulus starts us thinking about the stimulus.

When we think we get attached.

This causes us to make a conclusion – hey something is stimulating us

If we learn not to perceive by setting aside the thinking process the mind is made non-attached and our core is still.

If we learn not to be stimulated by the senses by not thinking about what is stimulating us, the mind does not make a conclusion – hey something is stimulating us.

How do you set aside the thinking process?

The objects of the world have life within and life spells movements.

Things in the world are made up of life that moves

By not attaching to it we achieve stillness which works on the primary cause.

By not making conclusions, the mind in not active.

Please dwell on this point of view.

How do you set aside the thinking process? I shut down the mind by stopping my diaphragm. What is your method?

One of the reasons I really like Satyananda’s approach is he says let the mind do whatever it wants to do, you do your practice. He doesn’t come out and say it in the book (he advises a guru) but the exercises in the book, result in the stoppage of the diaphragm. I was terrible at meditating prior to going breathless. My mind kept saying I don’t want to meditate, lets do something else. The only reason I made it to where I am at is because I kept my mind occupied doing pranayama exercises. Now it is the exact opposite. The clutter my mind produces has slowed so much that I would much rather meditate than engage the mind and perform breathing exercises.

I like Eckhart Tolle’s metaphor that explains how important the space is between the thoughts. Think of a room with many valuable things in it. But if you were to pick what is the most valuable thing in the room, it is nothing or no thing. Space is the most valuable thing in the room because without the space, the room would have no utility value or wouldn’t exist. The space is where the stillness is.


#66

Quote: I believe the purpose of the asanas is to open up the chakras, promote endurance, flexibility, and strength to prepare the body for long periods of meditation. I was first attracted to what I believe now is fluffy yoga that is designed more to promote presence, strength, endurance and flexibility. The Sivananda style that my instructor teaches lights up my body like a Christmas tree. I offered to explain my routine but nobody expressed interest and I don’t want to spend hours doing so if nobody cares to read about it.

I believe I expressed an interest. Allow me to be 100% understood. I am interested in reading about your Routine.

Thank you.


#67

I am interested as well. Most definatly.


#68

How do you set aside the thinking process? I shut down the mind by stopping my diaphragm. What is your method?

Thinking process is resident in the brain and not directly connected with diaphragm (which remains a breathing apparatus). Secondly, there is no need to “stop” the thinking process, neither one is advised to do so through laborious efforts. We are talking about ‘setting aside’. Here’s Patanjali’s method as I understand (and practice):

[B][U]The model[/U][/B]: The ?thinking instruments? (brain, mānas, and buddhi) are different from the ?thinking process?. Electromagnetic vibrations arrive from the environment?re?ceived as sense impulses which travel throughout the nervous system by means of the spinal cord and enter the brain. These vibrations are transferred to mānas flowing over the memory pools and then to buddhi. The energy of the incoming sense impulses stirs the structure of predispositions and these impulses attract memory patterns from the past-experienced emo-tions. Ideal thinking would be a process wherein the mind acts only as a catalyst, however, the untamed mind brings associated emotions to create vibrant ?individualized? thoughts causing mind modifications.

[U][/U]In the construction of thoughts Buddhi brings in the intellectual layer that makes an indi-vidual?s signature on the thoughts, mānas brings in the emotional layer that is judgmental, and the brain brings in a highly physi?cal/ sexual orientation. Why does the mind indulge? Under the influence of tamas, mind conceals that the incoming impulses are mere appearances. Moreover, such a shallow percep?tion is further affected by a conditioned cognition?one that uses only known patterns in the memory. Lastly, the emotional gloss creates attachment to the objects, and the mind lets us believe that such colored and deformed perception gives us our ?only reality.? Such indulgent mind deserves to be kept aside. Sūtra 2.25/II.54 tells us that pratyāhāra is a process in which one consciously separates the mind from the thinking process and not allow them to engage and interact. This is neither an accident nor a psychic adventure; it happens at will. That is why it?s a breakthrough.

For reaching this milestone the secondary means of Yoga con?tribute collectively?yama-niyama compliance eliminates causes of alternating mind-states, āsana steadies and stills the physical body to remove any residual agitations, and prāṇāyāma?s regu?lated breathing does the same to the astral body by eliminating the sentimental swings.

But what happens to mind is even more significant. All along, mind has been actively participating in the thinking process to generate knowledge even if it is conditioned, individualized and sentimental. Through the Yoga practices, mind evolves into its original self, the Universal Mind, and starts sourcing spiritual knowledge. Thus, in a dramatic turnaround, the brain and its part?ners stop creating defective knowledge and become users of exact knowledge. Mind can return to its original role of a catalyst and not indulge. This is non-attachment.

It is tough to control the sense organs that owe their natural out?bound tendency to a human legacy of millions of years. Instead of reining in the sense organs, it is easier to snap the link between sensing and thinking. This inattention results rather from a relaxed indifference.

Pratyāhāra is considered a breakthrough because, in that state, the freedom from longing for all objects eliminates the outward bound orientation of your perception. Instead of repeatedly forc?ing your attention inward, your perception would come to re?side there peacefully, at will. Desires are defused, perception is direct and independent of sensing, the sense organs are retired and mind is no more agitated.
Our usual reflex thinking directly connects the sense organs with the organs of action, resulting in an automated behavior / response. With the sense organs withdrawing from attachment to objects, the organs of activity are relieved of their bondage of compulsive habits and are brought under full conscious control. One develops a relaxed indifference toward objects, people, and events that, until then, had held you captive. But it all happens in several progressive phases.

First, there is an involuntary pause, Nirodh pariṇāma, (a state of mind transformation, is the silenc?ing of the senses) in this sequence:
? The brain reacts to that which is seen (saṃskāra).
? Then follows a moment of restraint (nirodha).
? Then ensues a moment wherein the mind responds to both these factors.
? Both factors momentarily hold each other out and the perceiving consciousness has full sway over that mo?ment (Sūtra 2.27/III.9).

A complete subjugation of the sense organs neither happens sud?denly nor is sustained for a long period. At first, the snapping of the link between sensing and thinking happens in a flash, for a fraction of a second. Though this pause leaves a beautiful memo?ry, it remains an involuntary occurrence. You need to cultivate the ability to interrupt thinking by a willful pause in order to hold on to that.

Then a response leads to a willed pause in this way:

  1. You are concentrating on some object and are slowly be?coming aware of the act of concentrating itself. To that awareness, the act of concentration becomes an object. This stimulates the mind into thought-forms and results in mind modifications.
  2. But now any modification is immediately followed by a different awareness, a need to control the modifications, and this brings in your will to stop the form creation, and the mind momentarily ceases to modify itself. But this control itself generates mild modifications.
  3. The above ?modify and control? sequence goes on for a while, but you persist and eventually manage to be aware of both triggers almost simultaneously.
  4. Then it happens?a willed pause. Both sensing and will?ing are delicately balanced and consciously suspended. Neither the object nor the controlling creates any mind modification. Your awareness suddenly elevates itself be?cause there is no medium for perception.

Any effort to control the mind is counterproductive, because the controlling thoughts create mind modifications and increase the mind turbulence. Early attempts at concentration become frustrating, because even with the eyes closed and the body stilled, either the object of meditation (if one has such an object) or the awareness of your act of meditating itself creates mind modifications. The thinking instruments and the thinking process have no agenda of their own. But, once the thinking instruments and the individual thinking process are so equipped, it is easier to apply the will to excite or inhibit the nerves and thus control the thoughts and actions. This ability further facilitates a willed pause that leaves space for the arising of spiritual perception.
Eventually, it is cultivation of habit from what first occurs as a one-of-a-kind involuntary flash. This is a long and often frustrat?ing process. But despite its momentary nature, the initial vision is alluring enough. The vision is life-changing. The so-called esoteric becomes a viable way of life. The abil?ity to separate the thinking instrument and the thinking process takes root at long last. When this becomes a habit and mind?s thought-form making tendency is arrested, that eventually re?sults in a constant ability of meditation (Sūtra 2.29/III.11). The brain is not activated, as they used to even at the slightest sensory provocation, and thus the thought-churning tendency is voided.

[B][U]The practice[/U][/B]: One needs a dual approach.

  1. Watching the thoughts with the thoughts: Only by knowing the thinking process more subtly can we control it. From time to time, we have to bring our thoughts under the microscope. The big advantage is that at that very moment the thought-chain is broken. Then, one should make a note (mental or written) of the thought and trace it backwards. On that pathway, we recognize a lot of branching out or diversions. That?s typical perpetuation of thoughts. Then, we should pick up 3 to 5 such diversions and trace what caused it. It would invariably something emotional, and something in deep memory. At this moment, one would always find an opportunity to space thoughts and eventually widen it further into a pause. Care should be taken in not pressing any harder as that itself causes more thoughts. As well as remember to apply slight efforts of will to suspend thoughts.

  2. Raising an antenna to the Universal Mind: Through a well-directed practice, one should activate bindu and sahasrara chakra. These chakras, when supplied energy, tend to derive intelligence from the Universal mind and provide it to the thinking apparatus. This reverses the flow ? the brain becomes a custodian of unconditioned knowledge, rather than the manufacturer of faulty experienced-based knowledge. This makes the thinking process redundant and dispensable.


#69

@Suhas Tambe you are either a very well studied intellect or a Yogi, perhaps both but either way I am convinced you know what you are talking about.

Your contributions to this thread are priceless. Thank you.


#70

@Suhas Tambe Ah I see you are both. I just purchased the book on Amazon this should be very interesting. It is Scheduled to arrive Thursday 2012-10-18.


#71

[QUOTE=Suhas Tambe;78776]Thinking process is resident in the brain and not directly connected with diaphragm (which remains a breathing apparatus). [/QUOTE]

I agree that the thinking process is resident in the brain. I disagree that there is no connection. I feel as if the mind is powered by the energy created by the diaphragm’s movements. How that is possible is beyond me. I don’t have a good understanding of how we are wired but I suspect the answer lies there.

Secondly, there is no need to “stop” the thinking process, neither one is advised to do so through laborious efforts. We are talking about ‘setting aside’. Here’s Patanjali’s method as I understand (and practice):

The model: The ?thinking instruments? (brain, mānas, and buddhi) are different from the ?thinking process?. Electromagnetic vibrations arrive from the environment?re?ceived as sense impulses which travel throughout the nervous system by means of the spinal cord and enter the brain. These vibrations are transferred to mānas flowing over the memory pools and then to buddhi. The energy of the incoming sense impulses stirs the structure of predispositions and these impulses attract memory patterns from the past-experienced emo-tions. Ideal thinking would be a process wherein the mind acts only as a catalyst, however, the untamed mind brings associated emotions to create vibrant ?individualized? thoughts causing mind modifications.

In the construction of thoughts Buddhi brings in the intellectual layer that makes an indi-vidual?s signature on the thoughts, mānas brings in the emotional layer that is judgmental, and the brain brings in a highly physi?cal/ sexual orientation. Why does the mind indulge? Under the influence of tamas, mind conceals that the incoming impulses are mere appearances. Moreover, such a shallow percep?tion is further affected by a conditioned cognition?one that uses only known patterns in the memory. Lastly, the emotional gloss creates attachment to the objects, and the mind lets us believe that such colored and deformed perception gives us our ?only reality.? Such indulgent mind deserves to be kept aside. Sūtra 2.25/II.54 tells us that pratyāhāra is a process in which one consciously separates the mind from the thinking process and not allow them to engage and interact. This is neither an accident nor a psychic adventure; it happens at will. That is why it?s a breakthrough.

For reaching this milestone the secondary means of Yoga con?tribute collectively?yama-niyama compliance eliminates causes of alternating mind-states, āsana steadies and stills the physical body to remove any residual agitations, and prāṇāyāma?s regu?lated breathing does the same to the astral body by eliminating the sentimental swings.

But what happens to mind is even more significant. All along, mind has been actively participating in the thinking process to generate knowledge even if it is conditioned, individualized and sentimental. Through the Yoga practices, mind evolves into its original self, the Universal Mind, and starts sourcing spiritual knowledge. Thus, in a dramatic turnaround, the brain and its part?ners stop creating defective knowledge and become users of exact knowledge. Mind can return to its original role of a catalyst and not indulge. This is non-attachment.

This is good stuff! The impulses from the individual’s sensory perception is filtered through a mechanism that is influenced by the current body and it’s stored history of retained memories. This influences the experience bringing the mind into the picture as it tries to gain an understanding of the perception using the history it has cataloged.

As long as your consciousness is plagued by the breath and the senses it cannot perform its proper function and is dominated by the mind. The breath gives life to the ego which is your thoughts on your life situation, a time based reality. Your mind then spends a good deal of time in the past and future, neither of which you are interested in. As long as the consciousness is plagued by senses, your mind is focused on body awareness that makes you believe you are a separate individual. The breath and the senses block your consciousness from it’s most important job which is to tap into God consciousness and the all knowingness that it provides.

The goal is to shut down everything that is causing us to think we are having an individual experience and to turn on our communication system to God consciousness. So when your kundalini is completely functional, you tap into universal knowledge and discard your experience as an individual, realizing you are one with all. The rewards from this knowingness are so much greater than anything that could be gained by experiencing life as an individual. And so you start working for the good of all humanity and realize that God is the doer, you are just experiencing his work through you. You gain complete understanding of the temporary nature of your body, a prison that is the cause of your consciousness’ feelings of separateness. In this state, your former desires and discomforts are either washed away or become trivial to you in the grand scheme of things.

This is why Satyananda writes that there are essentially two types of human beings: those who are on the pravritti path and those who are on the nivritti path. A man following the pravritti (outward) path looks away from bindu towards the outside world. He is almost entirely motivated by external events. This is the path of most people today and it leads away from self-knowledge and into bondage. The other path, the nivritti (reversed) path, is the spiritual path, the path of wisdom. On this path the individual begins to face the bindu, turning in towards the source of his being. This path leads to freedom. The path of evolution is the pravritti path of manifestation and extroversion. The path of involution leads back along the path that has produced your individual being. It leads back through the bindu to sahasrara. In fact, the whole purpose of yoga practice is to help direct your awareness along the involutionary path.

You definitely helped me gain a deeper understanding with this post. The funny thing is, I had all the information, you just helped me put it together better.

It is tough to control the sense organs that owe their natural out?bound tendency to a human legacy of millions of years. Instead of reining in the sense organs, it is easier to snap the link between sensing and thinking. This inattention results rather from a relaxed indifference.

Pratyāhāra is considered a breakthrough because, in that state, the freedom from longing for all objects eliminates the outward bound orientation of your perception. Instead of repeatedly forc?ing your attention inward, your perception would come to re?side there peacefully, at will. Desires are defused, perception is direct and independent of sensing, the sense organs are retired and mind is no more agitated.
Our usual reflex thinking directly connects the sense organs with the organs of action, resulting in an automated behavior / response. With the sense organs withdrawing from attachment to objects, the organs of activity are relieved of their bondage of compulsive habits and are brought under full conscious control. One develops a relaxed indifference toward objects, people, and events that, until then, had held you captive. But it all happens in several progressive phases.

First, there is an involuntary pause, Nirodh pariṇāma, (a state of mind transformation, is the silenc?ing of the senses) in this sequence:
? The brain reacts to that which is seen (saṃskāra).
? Then follows a moment of restraint (nirodha).
? Then ensues a moment wherein the mind responds to both these factors.
? Both factors momentarily hold each other out and the perceiving consciousness has full sway over that mo?ment (Sūtra 2.27/III.9).

A complete subjugation of the sense organs neither happens sud?denly nor is sustained for a long period. At first, the snapping of the link between sensing and thinking happens in a flash, for a fraction of a second. Though this pause leaves a beautiful memo?ry, it remains an involuntary occurrence. You need to cultivate the ability to interrupt thinking by a willful pause in order to hold on to that.

Then a response leads to a willed pause in this way:

  1. You are concentrating on some object and are slowly be?coming aware of the act of concentrating itself. To that awareness, the act of concentration becomes an object. This stimulates the mind into thought-forms and results in mind modifications.
  2. But now any modification is immediately followed by a different awareness, a need to control the modifications, and this brings in your will to stop the form creation, and the mind momentarily ceases to modify itself. But this control itself generates mild modifications.
  3. The above ?modify and control? sequence goes on for a while, but you persist and eventually manage to be aware of both triggers almost simultaneously.
  4. Then it happens?a willed pause. Both sensing and will?ing are delicately balanced and consciously suspended. Neither the object nor the controlling creates any mind modification. Your awareness suddenly elevates itself be?cause there is no medium for perception.

Any effort to control the mind is counterproductive, because the controlling thoughts create mind modifications and increase the mind turbulence. Early attempts at concentration become frustrating, because even with the eyes closed and the body stilled, either the object of meditation (if one has such an object) or the awareness of your act of meditating itself creates mind modifications. The thinking instruments and the thinking process have no agenda of their own. But, once the thinking instruments and the individual thinking process are so equipped, it is easier to apply the will to excite or inhibit the nerves and thus control the thoughts and actions. This ability further facilitates a willed pause that leaves space for the arising of spiritual perception.
Eventually, it is cultivation of habit from what first occurs as a one-of-a-kind involuntary flash. This is a long and often frustrat?ing process. But despite its momentary nature, the initial vision is alluring enough. The vision is life-changing. The so-called esoteric becomes a viable way of life. The abil?ity to separate the thinking instrument and the thinking process takes root at long last. When this becomes a habit and mind?s thought-form making tendency is arrested, that eventually re?sults in a constant ability of meditation (Sūtra 2.29/III.11). The brain is not activated, as they used to even at the slightest sensory provocation, and thus the thought-churning tendency is voided.

The practice: One needs a dual approach.

  1. Watching the thoughts with the thoughts: Only by knowing the thinking process more subtly can we control it. From time to time, we have to bring our thoughts under the microscope. The big advantage is that at that very moment the thought-chain is broken. Then, one should make a note (mental or written) of the thought and trace it backwards. On that pathway, we recognize a lot of branching out or diversions. That?s typical perpetuation of thoughts. Then, we should pick up 3 to 5 such diversions and trace what caused it. It would invariably something emotional, and something in deep memory. At this moment, one would always find an opportunity to space thoughts and eventually widen it further into a pause. Care should be taken in not pressing any harder as that itself causes more thoughts. As well as remember to apply slight efforts of will to suspend thoughts.

Good luck with that path. I tried watching the thinker with my first meditation teacher. My mind was just too restless and now it is becoming less of an issue. I think the Kriya - Kechari turn on your kundalini and shut down the diaphragm is an easier path. At least for me it was. I’ve read that you go into your spine in kechari stage 2 and you learn to shut the senses shut down one by one. I remember in Yogananda’s autobiography he wrote that as a child he would practice this. Page 109 in Autobiography of a Yogi ?in the first stage of samadhi (sabikalpa), the devotee shuts off all sensory testimony of the outer world.

  1. Raising an antenna to the Universal Mind: Through a well-directed practice, one should activate bindu and sahasrara chakra. These chakras, when supplied energy, tend to derive intelligence from the Universal mind and provide it to the thinking apparatus. This reverses the flow ? the brain becomes a custodian of unconditioned knowledge, rather than the manufacturer of faulty experienced-based knowledge. This makes the thinking process redundant and dispensable.

I really like this concept! I imagine that initially it comes in as ?feelings? or intuition. As the connection grows it eventually turns into God consciousness. How do you activate your bindu and sahasrara?


#72

[QUOTE=Seeking;78765]Quote: I am interested in reading about your Routine.
[/QUOTE]

Here is my salutation vinyasana that I start my practice with – you can go as fast or as slow as you want but stay with the breath. Every movement is done while either inhaling signified by (I) or exhaling signified by (E):

Start off the vinyasana in standing namaste

  1. (I) Hasta Uttanasana
  2. (E) Standing Forward Fold
  3. (I) Urdhuva Uttanasana (keep tips of fingers touching the toes)
  4. (E) place the hands on the ground, float the feet back and lower into Chaturanga Dandasana
  5. (I) Upward Dog
  6. (E) Downward Dog
  7. (I) One legged Downward facing Dog (raise one leg into the air)
  8. (E) One legged Downward facing Dog Bent Knee version (bring the raised leg over the body opening the hip.
  9. (I) Runner’s pose (bring the raised leg all the way into runner’s pose
  10. (E) Triangle Pose
  11. (I) Warrior I
  12. (E) Warrior II
  13. (I) Tree Pose
  14. (E) Warrior III
  15. (I) Half Moon Pose (normally this pose is entered with an exhale)
  16. (E) Drop both hands to the ground, raise the extended leg as high as you can – I don’t know the name of this pose
  17. (I) Crescent Moon Pose
  18. (E) Side Angle Pose
    19 (I) Reverse Warrior Pose
  19. (E) through Chaturanga Dandasana until the body is lying on the ground
  20. (I) Cobra Pose
  21. (E) lower to the ground place the arms at your sides, palms facing the ground
  22. (I) Locust Pose
  23. (E) Lower to the ground place the hands back near the shoulders
  24. (I) Upward Dog
  25. (E) Downward Dog
    27 Look between your hands – jump or float the legs forward then (I) Urdhuva Uttanasana (the third pose in this series)
  26. (E) Standing Forward Fold
    29 (I) Hasta Uttanasana (the first pose in the series)
    30 (E) Standing Namaste

Repeat the vinyasana on the other side of the body.

Here are some pictures of the poses - you have to cut and paste

  1. shutterstock.com/s/"hasta+uttanasana"/search.html#id=104722715&src=7ce7c1c7b83e5654c6e3ff9d27c5a007-1-2
  2. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uttanasana
  3. yogabasics.com/forward-bending-poses/upward-forward-fold.html (note - keep hands on the floor)
  4. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaturanga_Dandasana
  5. yogajournal.com/basics/2338
  6. yoga.isport.com/yoga-guides/how-to-do-three-legged-downward-dog-in-yoga
  7. This is taking too long to find pictures – hopefully you already know these postures – if not ask me and I will send a link. A few more posts and I will be able to post the actual links so you wont have to cut and paste.

This gives you a taste of the type of practice I like. I usually do 10 or 20 depending on my energy levels and the time I have for practice. I then go into the rest of my routine that is heavily influenced by my instructor’s Sivananda background. If somebody practices at least 10 of these and posts that they like it and want more of my routine, I will spend the time to outline the Sivinanda practice. When I’m feeling lazy I will do Pawanmuktasana which I learned from Motoyama. According to Motoyama, this series promotes the unimpeded flow of prana through the nadis, primarily by releasing the blockages in the joints. This is a much easier practice that I do with my mother or other people that don’t want to be challenged as much physically. I also do some seated asanas with this. Here is a youtube link:

They also have a Pawanmuktasana series II and III that I intend to learn and add to my tool kit. There are many things that I would like to read, learn and practice. Sometimes I feel overwhelmed with my list of things to do. Other times I feel so blessed to have so much good information available to learn.

Another practice that I’ve benefited from is Anmol Mehta’s spinal warmup. If your back feels tired or hurts this is a good 5 minute series to practice before meditation. This guy’s generosity of putting so much information out for free is inspiring:


#73

The vagus nerve connectes lungs,stomach,liver,heart. This is all around the area of diaphragm. A moving diaphragm would stimulate this nerve. This nerve is also connected to memory.


#74

[QUOTE=Avatar186;78826]The vagus nerve connectes lungs,stomach,liver,heart. This is all around the area of diaphragm. A moving diaphragm would stimulate this nerve. This nerve is also connected to memory.[/QUOTE]

Thank you for that. It doesn’t surprise me one bit. What I’m saying is not that outlandish:

I feel as if the mind is powered by the energy created by the diaphragm’s movements. How that is possible is beyond me. I don’t have a good understanding of how we are wired but I suspect the answer lies there.

After all we are doing these exercises that open up our chakras and when they are completely open, they power up part of the brain that is not being used right now. So what is so extraordinary to think that a powered up diaphragm isn’t powering up the part of the mind responsible for our time based reality; the ego, memories. And taking this thought a bit further, that the electrical impulses bringing the sensory perceptions to the mind aren’t also powering up the part of the mind that is responsible for our present based reality.

I have a friend with special benefits that recently left Panama to visit her family. It had been several weeks since I had last seen her and I was due to pick her up at the airport in a few hours. I kept having to look at my watch because I am not very good at judging what time it is any more. I remember looking at my watch thinking I don’t have to go pick her up for two hours. That is great, I have plenty of time to do what ever I want. I can read. I can meditate. What do I want to do right now?

The reason I bring this up is because prior to going breathless the only thing that I would’ve been focused on was the fact that I soon would be one with another divine being. I don’t think I would’ve thought of it in that manner but you get my point. Since that was several hours away and my mind was shut down, the anticipation of future based pleasures did absolutely nothing for me. It is too much of a coincidence that every time I shut down my diaphragm, that my mind also shut down.

The books all say we are not the mind, we are consciousness. The consciousness has access to the universal truths through the ajna. The mind is suppose to be a tool of the consciousness. It’s job is to tell the consciousness what is going on in the body. Somehow the mind has taken over the consciousness making us believe that the mind and body is all you are. You can intellectually believe that this is not true but until you actually shut down the mind, you cannot utilize the full resources of the consciousness and therefore this is not truth to you but merely beliefs. The contents of the mind is made up of current sensory perceptions and stored sensory perceptions.

When the mind is focused on the stored sensory perceptions, you focus on a time based reality. Your life is consumed by memories or a fantasy based future. I believe shutting down the breath takes care of the stored sensory perceptions or the time based reality. The next step is to shut down the current sensory perceptions or body awareness which gives us our present “reality”. I believe the ability to do that comes after the achievement of kechari stage II and so I can’t speak intelligently about this. Most of the senses the body has, sight, hearing, smell and taste are near the tongue. I have read that a circuit is completed when the tongue enters the nasal pharynx. What does this allow us to do?

I don’t remember where I read this metaphor but it is a good one. The mind’s ability to perceive the world is very limited like looking out one window of a building on a large university’s campus and then trying to relate what is going on on the entire campus. Since the view is so limited, of course you are not going to get a complete picture of what is happening. You might not even understand correctly what is happening right before your eyes because something could be taking place right behind the objects you’re viewing.

The consciousness knows the minds limitations. Unfortunately for us, the mind has somehow hijacked the consciousness’ control and tricked it into thinking that the mind is all that there is. Therefore it is up to us to unplug everything that is supplying the mind with energy until it shuts down and consciousness regains control and subjugates the mind back to its proper role. And that again is telling the consciousness only what is happening within the body. I recall reading several yogis claiming their former selves no longer exist. They killed the mind. How did they do that? Is that the ultimate goal?

I believe the mind is powered by the breath and the senses. I don’t know how our digestive and circulatory systems fit into the picture. The energy created by the diaphragm’s movements give power to the mind. Does the energy created from impulses of the senses power the mind too? Again according to Yogananda, the first level of Samadhi is when you can shut the senses down. I think that is when a true understanding of what is consciousness and what is mind begins. Not a complete understanding but you realize that you are not this body or mind. I’m sorry if I keep regurgitating the same information over and over, I’m just trying to gain a better understanding. And I’m never going to get it until I experience it so this is a fool’s errand.

That said I a glad my practice doesn’t involve thinking about the thinker think and waiting for the thinking to become an object. Because in my line of thinking, thinking about thinking is not all that it is thought to be. And so if you think that I should start thinking this way, I say think again. I think that I’ve done all the thinking about thinking this way I’m going to think in this lifetime. All joking aside Suhas, you’re a better man than me if you can make it on that path. I don’t like the sound of “early attempts at concentration become frustrating” and later “this is a long and frustrating process.”

I don’t count how many Talabya Kriyas I do a day. It has to be at least a thousand. I do it in the elevator, in my car, walking to the gym, pretty much whenever I’m alone and don’t think anyone can see me. My tongue no longer hurts from contact with my bottom teeth and I can easily do hundreds at a clip. I no longer count because what is the point? The goal is not a specified number, the present goal is the nasal pharynx and the ultimate goal is Amrit. I noticed that my tongue is starting to curl more and believe this ability comes from whipping the tongue around in practicing Talabya. I am knocking on heaven’s door so to speak because I can now take the tip of my tongue and press it repeatedly into the the soft skin that will soon support it in stage II.

Have you practiced your Talabyas today?


#75

I just joined to thank you Mr. Umunhum for your thoughtfulness in posting your initial experiences and sharing your knowledge. I sincerely appreciate your discourse! You too Seeking, as your thread on Khechari has been very illuminating and led me to this post. Thank you!

I am currently working out of the Systematic Course by Satyananda. Hearing about your techniques and findings is confirming my direction and I really can’t thank you enough!

I hope to contribute more as I start progressing deeper. At this juncture, however, I’m merely a novice practicing asana, pranayama, mudras and bandhas. I haven’t yet moved into full kriya practice even though I have had a couple of instances of intense kundalini energy surges in the past and practice bandhas every morning for instantiating kundalini flow although that practice is very brief unfortunately as time doesn’t allow for more. The afternoons and evenings have been devoted to practice as time allows.

Umunhum, please do post more of your asana practice as it seems you have found considerable refinement there. I’m still struggling a bit with how to fit everything in. Which is fine, since I have the rest of my life to practice. However, being eager, I’m excited to get going and digging deeper.

I was reading Kundalini Tantra (p. 183) by Satyananda last night and came upon this piece of information in case anyone cares:

There have been many reports of people who have entered into states of hibernation or suspended animation underneath the earth. This phenomenon has been verified many times under strict scientific observation. This human hibernation has been witnessed for periods as long as forty days. Not all cases have been genuine, but when authentic, they have been carried out exactly in the following manner. Initially pranayama is practiced assiduously, until kumbhaka has been perfected. At this stage, khechari mudra is performed. [B]This is not the simple form of khechari as performed in kundalini yoga sadhana, but the practice from the hatha yoga tradition in which the root or frenulum of the under surface of the tongue is gradually cut and the tongue is slowly elongated and inserted into the nasopharynx. It blocks off the passage as a cork seals a bottle. The whole practice is perfected over a two year period.[/B]

By this practice, the drops from bindu fall to vishuddhi and subsequently permeate the whole bodily system. These drops of nectar maintain the nutrition and vitality of the bodily tissues while simultaneously arresting the metabolic processes of the body. When the metabolism of the cells and tissues of the body is suspended in this way, oxygen is no longer required and cellular wastes are not produced. Therefore, the person who hibernates can live without breathing for quite an extended period of time. Even facial hair does not grow during the period of hibernation.

Disclaimer: I’m in no way advocating this practice and only reciting for informational purposes only. Please contact a yoga expert before undertaking any yogic practice.